Colossian Blog
June 16, 2012 | Matthew Dodrill

The Colossian Blog: An Invitation to a New Kind of Conversation

Greetings, and welcome to The Colossian Blog!

We are glad you are here, and it is our prayer that you are enriched and blessed by the content posted in the coming weeks, months, and years. Our mission at The Colossian Forum is to unite Christian believers in the shared confession and embodied practice that all things hold together in Christ (Col. 1:17). As many of us have observed, the tone of the conversation regarding the intersection of faith, science, and culture is often vitriolic and divisive. Rather than accepting the differences among believers as gifts, we often stake our hope in our individual “positions” at the expense of Christian unity. At The Colossian Forum, however, we strive to foster a new kind of conversation guided by the truth that all things, including our differences, are held together in Jesus Christ. When we confess that all things hold together in Christ, we confess that the core of the world is peaceful communion, not competition that breeds fear and division.

But we understand the fear. Science and cultural research often lead us into the realm of unknowing, where we are out of our comfort zones and beyond familiar territory. We believe, however, that we are free to investigate the realm of unknowing because, once again, Christ holds together the things we know with the things we do not know. We should thus have confidence in where our investigations lead us, not because we have faith in science or cultural research, but because we have faith in the Lord Jesus, who holds together the truth of our investigations. Our hope is that this shared confession at least reduces the fear, and that it eventually teaches us that fear is not necessary in our pursuit of truth.

Okay, so all things hold together in Christ. We can start the conversation now, right? Well, we don’t believe it’s that easy. A lot of people believe that merely having the right information enables them to have productive conversations on, say, the intersection of faith and science. But we believe it’s important to ask if we’re even the kinds of people who can have this conversation. In other words, we believe there are requisite virtues that enable us to remain unified throughout a dialogue that is likely to reveal many differences of opinion and serious disagreements. While information and ideas are important, they are not sufficient to sustain the unity of believers who choose to enter this conversation. Rather, there must also be the formation of believers within the context of our worship together (Col. 3:15-17). After all, the shared confession that all things hold together in Christ is also an embodied practice – we actually act out the truth that Christ holds all things together by being charitable and hospitable to each other.

Charity is the primary virtue of The Colossian Forum, and hospitality is charity put into practice. On The Colossian Blog, we encourage all featured writers and visitors to exhibit the Christian charity and hospitality that is cultivated in our churches. We desire that all visitors use this virtual space as a location in which to practice and exercise wisdom, charity, patience, and compassion for the sake of Christian unity, discipleship, and reconciliation. Without the formation of these virtues, we cannot be unified in the pursuit of the Spirit’s wisdom. This is true because the inverse is true: without the Spirit’s wisdom, we cannot be formed into virtuous people. We hope that you seek the Spirit’s wisdom for the purpose of cultivating the virtues that will bless your conversation partners, even if there are significant disagreements or differences of opinion. The communion you have with your Christian brothers and sisters on this blog is far more important than your individual positions. After all, Christian unity bears witness to the glory of God; at a time when the internet is a primary source of communication, research, and information, you can be sure that the world is watching how we treat each other in the blogosphere.  What’s more, when we seek communion with believers, we are able to pursue truth the right way: together.

As we invite you to grapple with the issues at the intersection of faith, science, and culture, we ask that you be mindful of our Writers’ Guidelines and Forum Etiquette. The former explains the mission and goals we want shared by our writers and visitors, and the latter explains how we generally expect our visitors to conduct themselves on our blog. We think it would benefit all visitors to read over these links before diving in to the comment sections.

Again, we are glad you are here, and we look forward to the insights you have to offer. In the next post I will highlight some of the points raised by James K.A. Smith in his recent review of Peter Enns’ book The Evolution of Adam: What the Bible Does and Doesn’t Say about Human Origins. Stay tuned.

Comments (2)
Luke D on June 21, 2012 at 9:25 pm

great start guys, you got me excited for what will come on this forum. Great video and great opening statements, a truley good step forward and I look forward to watching where you go with this and learning from you as well as walking with you!

Blessings in Christ- through whom we all exist!

I am excited!

bryan halferty on June 29, 2012 at 10:41 pm

Thanks so much for this vision. As a college pastor I often feel the tension as I seek to lead and provoke the conservative-churched and seeker-unchurched, simultaneously. I’m looking forward to passing this site on.

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