Colossian Blog
May 24, 2017 | Trey Tirpak

Reflections on Unity

As a soon-to-be college graduate who is looking forward to heading out into the world, I’ve realized that I’m inheriting an American society that is more polarized than ever. Republicans hate Democrats, Democrats hate Republicans, and all of us are suspicious of those Independents. As I think about where I may find my next church home, I often read the statements of faith that many churches now publish on their websites. I ask myself if it’s a liberal church or a conservative church. I wonder what position their members and leadership take on gay marriage or evolution. Sometimes, from just a simple glance at a church web page, I uncharitably conclude that, “These aren’t the type of Christians I want to worship with”. I assume that I am not alone in this.

Yet are we not one church? Do we not eat at one table, kneel at one cross, praise but one name? Across political, socioeconomic, and geographic divides, all Christians claim the same good news: that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us and was resurrected. How, then, do we account for the incredible differences in opinion among Christians today and what exactly do we do about it?

The Apostle Paul compares the church to a human body. Like a human body, the body of Christ is made up of many parts. In 1 Corinthians 12 Paul writes, “Some of us are Jews, some are Gentiles, some are slaves, and some are free. But we have all been baptized into one body by one Spirit, and we all share the same Spirit”. Each part of the body brings a different perspective, a different understanding, and has a different role to play. But no part can function on its own and all must work together to survive. Even in the tremendous diversity of the body, by God’s power there is unity.

This unity in Christ has been hard to see in recent times. Christians of differing theological understandings have resorted to schism and isolation rather than attempting the hard work of confronting conflict. And while it may seem easier for rival factions to simply go their separate ways, where is the Christian witness in running from difficult situations? Is our belief in God’s power so small that we cannot fathom the bridging of our differences? Is our commitment to Jesus’ command to love one another really so weak? Paul’s words admonish our actions: “The eye can never say to the hand, ‘I don’t need you.’ The head can’t say to the feet, ‘I don’t need you.'”

Our Christian witness is not found in our ability to agree on all things. We are not called to be a church of mindless clones. That is the witness of human culture, which forces individuals to choose between agreement or exclusion. Instead, our Christian witness is found in the fact that we are one body of many disagreeing parts. Our witness is found in our diversity, in our humility, in our graciousness, in our love for God, and in our love for one another. This is something the world cannot offer, for only God can hold together such a messy, marvelous body. As it is written in Colossians 1:17-18 (TCF’s namesake verse), “in Christ all things hold together. He is the head of the body, the church ….”

Even with Christ as the head, disagreements will still exist among believers. But Christians have a choice when it comes to conflict in their churches. And when we choose to let Christ hold us together, we choose to receive the blessing of his saving grace and the power of his resurrection. The spiritual death that is enmity, division, and suspicion can be turned into a renewed life of love, unity, and understanding.

I’ve seen it happen in my own life. I work at a church whose theological and political leanings differ from mine. Over the years, I’ve found myself becoming more critical and less gracious in my thoughts toward my church. But God has been working on my heart, and while I still don’t agree with some of my church family, I’ve started loving them in a new way. Instead of loving my church family despite our disagreements, I’ve somehow come to love them because of those disagreements. I’m beginning to realize that my brothers and sisters who disagree with me are not some sort of trial or hardship, but an example of God’s grace in my life. How else are we to experience God’s grace and power if not through his ability to renew our lives in the midst of conflict and disagreement?

I have been blessed with the time I’ve had as an intern at The Colossian Forum. My experience here has helped me come to a new understanding of what it means to be a part of the body of Christ. As I move forward into this next chapter of my life, I pray for opportunities to put this new perspective into practice, trusting that all things truly will hold together in Christ.

Comments (1)
Thomas Webb on May 26, 2017 at 1:23 pm

Nicely stated. At the heart of much of the disagreement is in understanding “facts” and “truth”. They are often the foundation for our beliefs. We need to go underneath the disagreement and look at the roots, the foundation. Congratulations on your graduation. Keep these writings and review every decade and see how you change in the next 50 years! Cousin Thomas

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