Colossian Blog
June 21, 2017 | Jennifer Vander Molen

TCF Welcomes Chris De Vos as our Manager of Church Partnerships and Care

The Colossian Forum is very pleased to welcome Chris De Vos as our Manager of Church Partnerships and Care. This position will help expand our network of church partners, provide leadership of Colossian Way leaders, and develop our Community of Practice.

Chris graduated from Calvin College and Calvin Seminary and completed a Doctor of Ministry degree at Northern Baptist Theological Seminary in Lombard, Illinois. He worked as a pastor in the Christian Reformed Church at the University of Colorado, Boulder; in Dunwoody, Georgia; Kingston, Ontario; and, most recently, in Holland, Michigan.

The threads of reconciliation and unity were woven into his life by his musician parents, who moved easily between churches of different denominations. Chris grew up assuming it was possible to collaborate across differences.

That spirit continued to characterize his time at Pillar Church, leading to the church’s decision to become a dual-affiliation congregation of the Christian Reformed Church in North America and the Reformed Church in America (CRC and RCA). Pillar has become a laboratory of collaborative work with Hope College, Western Theological Seminary and other churches and agencies.  In 2015, he moved to lead the Ridder Church Renewal initiative at Western Theological Seminary.

Chris and his wife Barb are celebrating 39 years of marriage this year, and have three grown children and two grandchildren. He enjoys playing guitar, running, reading and travel. Chris begins his work at TCF on Monday, July 3. You can reach him at cdevos@colossianforum.org.

Welcome, Chris!

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