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Colossian Blog
August 23, 2017 | Trey Tirpak

Dancing with Truth and Love

Conversation is more about right relationship than right data.

The Colossian Forum uses the power of conversation, but why?

Throughout scripture we see that God is the God of language. God speaks and creation comes into being. God speaks to the Israelites through clouds, fire, judges, prophets, priests, and kings. God has always been trying to have a conversation with his people to tell them what truth and love is.

The problem is, we messed up the conversation. We thought we knew what the facts were, and so then we didn’t need God. Truth and love got lost in our pride.

God literally set the record straight by coming and having a conversation with us, as one of us. You see, God became human not to see what it’s like to be human, but rather so that we might know who he is!

Here’s the kicker, though: Jesus didn’t merely tell us the right words –the right information– about God, but Jesus showed us who God is. Truth and love aren’t just facts to know like when the Civil War ended or something. Truth and love are a person: Jesus. What this means is that knowing truth and love is more so about being in a relationship than knowing information.

So, if we want to know truth and love, we not only need to know Jesus’ words, but we need to be in relationship with him and then also become like Him. What am I talking about here?

Practicing virtues are how we come to know truth and love

Let’s think about truly knowing something. Take dancing as an example:

If you want to learn to dance, you can study dancing in a book all day long, and maybe you’ll even get to the point where you think you know what it means to dance. But there’s one problem with this: we don’t actually know what it means to be dancers until we start dancing ourselves.  To truly know how to dance, we need to practice dancing over and over again until it becomes second nature to us –part of who we are.

By practicing dancing, we become dancers, and truly know what it means to dance. When we practice being like Jesus, we become like Jesus, and thus truly know what truth and love is.

This is what the Colossian Way does: it has us practice good habits, habits that make us like Jesus.  

We call these habits virtues.  And, if we’re going to be serious about both getting to know truth and love and then eventually holding them together, we’re going to have to take practicing virtues seriously.

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