Colossian Blog

Displaying all posts tagged "Wicked Problems".
From Conflict to Unity and a New Way Forward
August 16, 2017 | Jennifer Vander Molen
From Conflict to Unity and a New Way Forward
We're honored that Pillar Church asked TCF president Michael Gulker to present on Conflict as Opportunity: Learning to Fight Like Jesus, as part of their Christ in the City series in Holland, Michigan. Christ in the City is focusing on how Christians can make peace with duality in the world. Topics covered include creation, gender, politics, the church body, and human sexuality. Pillar was the site of a denominational split in the 1850s. Like many tough conflicts, tensions were high, both sides entrenched in the truth as they believed it, and answers simply pointed to the growing divide. It came to a head when some members of Pillar Church locked other members out, went on to start a new church, which soon led to a new denomination. It's a familiar story of conflict and separation, even over 150 years later. Pillar's history is defined by division and conflict, and today they are the first church that is dually affiliated with the denominations involved in the split.  It's not an easy path, but a remarkable one that truly shows that "all things hold together in Christ" (Colossians 1:17). In our watchful, divided, and polarized world, we're thrilled to be partners with churches like Pillar who engage in deep discipleship and are proof of what it looks like when you turn conflict into opportunity. Here's the audio of Michael Gulker's presentation on learning to fight like Jesus. [audio mp3="http://colossianforum.org/site.2016/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Pillar_20170809_CITC.mp3"][/audio] Curious how we're helping make a more beautiful church? Our mission here at The Colossian Forum is to equip leaders to transform cultural conflicts into opportunities for spiritual growth and witness. We want to see a more beautiful church, one that acts Christian, especially in the face of conflict. Check out our series of three short videos that introduces The Colossian Way. The first covers wicked problems. [embed]https://vimeo.com/180640688[/embed] The second tackles Christian virtues: [embed]https://vimeo.com/187857994[/embed] And the third outlines how we see conflict as opportunity here at TCF. [embed]https://vimeo.com/180188904[/embed] We have a short video discussion guide that accompanies this video series. To access it, email us at info@colossianforum.org. Simply mention videos in the subject line. When you email us, we'll also send you our Top Ten Frequently Asked Questions to help guide your discipleship journey. One Last Thing The Colossian Forum shot a video at Pillar Church a few years ago that highlights our foundation in faith, science, and culture, and how that important conversation is a stepping stone to deeper discipleship and Christian witness. Enjoy! [embed]https://vimeo.com/32912914[/embed]
From Complication and Frustration to A Third Place
August 2, 2017 | Jennifer Vander Molen
From Complication and Frustration to A Third Place
Often people think that what we do at The Colossian Forum centers around conflict resolution and agreeing to disagree. Those simple phrases don't quite capture how reframing the conversation around love of God and love of neighbor can truly transform messy situations into deep spiritual growth and witness. That's why this eight-minute video from Parker Palmer is so illuminating. This Quaker elder and educator shares about finding a third space in the middle of polarizing sides clashing. He acknowledges that when conversation around difficult issues involves us throwing conclusions at one another, it's not a conversation worth having because it won't go anywhere worth going. The centrality of right relationship with our fellow brothers and sisters is vital to holding complexity all the way to new possibilities. Here at TCF, we're the first to admit that us humans are complicated and the topics we delve into are complicated. But we believe there's a way forward. We've seen it happen. This video helps articulate the deeper third space this process and framing inhabits. We hope it will help identify, clarify, and move you forward. Thanks to our partners at Long Beach Christian Fellowship, who shared this video with us and plan to use it to explain The Colossian Way to their church.
Unsure How to Lead Through Conflict? Start Here!
June 14, 2017 | Jennifer Vander Molen
Unsure How to Lead Through Conflict? Start Here!
Difficult questions face us on all sides. We often avoid them, argue about them, and divide over them. Is there a way beyond apathy or argument, division or tolerance to discipleship and faithfulness? Yes. That may seem like an audacious answer, but the gospel IS audacious. So we believe there is a way through difficult questions to discipleship and faithfulness. The Colossian Way small group experience is designed to help Christians of all ages who disagree to engage difficult questions in ways that build up love of God and love of neighbor. By gathering Christians who disagree, confessing that all things hold together in Christ (Colossians 1:17), bringing our difficulties before God in prayer, listening to varied experts on the topics being discussed, attending to Scripture and the resources of the faith, and learning to listen across difference, we can trust the Holy Spirit to transform us into the image of Christ. Want to learn more? If so, consider watching and discussing the three videos below with your leadership team or small group. The first video introduces the concept of wicked problems, the second explains why Christian virtues and practices matter, and the third presents conflict as opportunity. Thanks to Dr. Jenell Paris, a fellow with The Colossian Forum, who helped us craft these discussion questions. Looking for a printable version of this video discussion guide? We've got you covered. Video 1: Wicked Problems Discussion questions: Have you or your church faced something that could be called a “tame problem”? How was that problem solved? Have you or your church faced something that could be called a “wicked problem”? How is it different than a tame problem? What are some wicked problems facing the church today? How does your church generally respond to wicked problems? What are some characteristics of a culture war? If the church addressed divisive issues in a different way, what would that way look like? How do you respond to the claim, “God has given us everything we need to make progress on these important conversations”? Does that seem realistic? What has God given us that might prove sufficient in the midst of difficult conversations? Video 2: Christian Virtues Discussion questions: In what ways is it counterintuitive to turn our attention in the middle of conflict from information to formation? Have you ever gathered information to fight for your point against an opponent? In what ways is that satisfying? In what ways is it not satisfying? What does worship mean in your life? Discuss the claim made in the video: “Worship forms us, helping us see conflict through the lens of love for God and neighbor.” Have you ever seen people engage in conflict differently because they worship together? If you haven’t seen this, can you imagine what it might be like? Is it true that church is “the perfect venue” for difficult conversations and conflict? Many people experience the opposite--church being the most painful and difficult place for the real stuff of life. Could your church be the perfect venue for hosting difficult conversations about divisive issues? Could your church be a place where worship forms people such that they engage conflict not as a war, but as an opportunity to live out love for God and neighbor? Talk about how these ideals could be put into practice at your church. In what ways is information good? In what ways does it fall short? Tell a story about a memorable experience in Sunday School from when you were young. What lessons or practices from Sunday School are as true and relevant today as they were then? What Sunday School insights could help your church engage in conflict and conversation over divisive issues? Tell a story about a memorable experience in Sunday School from when you were young. What lessons or practices from Sunday School are as true and relevant today as they were then? What Sunday School insights could help your church engage in conflict and conversation over divisive issues? Tell about a time in your life when conflict proved to be a catalyst for growth. How could this be true for your church today? Video 3: Conflict as Opportunity Discussion questions: The pine cone matures for two years and then waits for fire to complete its growth. How do worship and church life mature us in ways that make us ready to face the fire of conflict? “If you want to get strong, you don’t avoid pain. You lean into it until the weight gets easier and easier to lift.” Share stories of times when pain was an important part of growth. Weightlifting makes muscles strong. To be strong in virtue, we must work those muscles. In your church, what are times and places where people work the muscles of love and patience? Name some wicked problems that impact your church. Try out the pine cone metaphor as a way of viewing these challenges: imagining that the fires of conflict could transform your church. What would that be like? Share a story about a time when you saw people in church “practicing what they preach, in the middle of the fire.” What did people say and do? What were the results? This discussion is also available as a PDF. Help yourself to this free resource!
Setting Off on The Colossian Way
December 14, 2016 | Jennifer Vander Molen
Setting Off on The Colossian Way
Difficult questions face us on all sides. We often avoid them, argue about them, and divide over them. Is there a way beyond apathy or argument, division or tolerance to discipleship and faithfulness? Yes. That may seem like an audacious answer, but the gospel IS audacious. So we believe there is a way through difficult questions to discipleship and faithfulness. The Colossian Way small group experience is designed to help Christians of all ages who disagree to engage difficult questions in ways that build up love of God and love of neighbor. By gathering Christians who disagree, confessing that all things hold together in Christ (Colossians 1:17), bringing our difficulties before God in prayer, listening to varied experts on the topics being discussed, attending to Scripture and the resources of the faith, and learning to listen across difference, we can trust the Holy Spirit to transform us into the image of Christ. Want to learn more? If so, consider watching and discussing the three videos below with your leadership team or small group. The first video introduces the concept of wicked problems, the second explains why Christian virtues and practices matter, and the third presents conflict as opportunity. Thanks to Dr. Jenell Paris, a fellow with The Colossian Forum, who helped us craft these discussion questions. Looking for a printable version of this video discussion guide? We've got you covered. Video 1: Wicked Problems Discussion questions: Have you or your church faced something that could be called a “tame problem”? How was that problem solved? Have you or your church faced something that could be called a “wicked problem”? How is it different than a tame problem? What are some wicked problems facing the church today? How does your church generally respond to wicked problems? What are some characteristics of a culture war? If the church addressed divisive issues in a different way, what would that way look like? How do you respond to the claim, “God has given us everything we need to make progress on these important conversations”? Does that seem realistic? What has God given us that might prove sufficient in the midst of difficult conversations? Video 2: Christian Virtues Discussion questions: In what ways is it counterintuitive to turn our attention in the middle of conflict from information to formation? Have you ever gathered information to fight for your point against an opponent? In what ways is that satisfying? In what ways is it not satisfying? What does worship mean in your life? Discuss the claim made in the video: “Worship forms us, helping us see conflict through the lens of love for God and neighbor.” Have you ever seen people engage in conflict differently because they worship together? If you haven’t seen this, can you imagine what it might be like? Is it true that church is “the perfect venue” for difficult conversations and conflict? Many people experience the opposite--church being the most painful and difficult place for the real stuff of life. Could your church be the perfect venue for hosting difficult conversations about divisive issues? Could your church be a place where worship forms people such that they engage conflict not as a war, but as an opportunity to live out love for God and neighbor? Talk about how these ideals could be put into practice at your church. In what ways is information good? In what ways does it fall short? Tell a story about a memorable experience in Sunday School from when you were young. What lessons or practices from Sunday School are as true and relevant today as they were then? What Sunday School insights could help your church engage in conflict and conversation over divisive issues? Tell a story about a memorable experience in Sunday School from when you were young. What lessons or practices from Sunday School are as true and relevant today as they were then? What Sunday School insights could help your church engage in conflict and conversation over divisive issues? Tell about a time in your life when conflict proved to be a catalyst for growth. How could this be true for your church today? Video 3: Conflict as Opportunity Discussion questions: The pine cone matures for two years and then waits for fire to complete its growth. How do worship and church life mature us in ways that make us ready to face the fire of conflict? “If you want to get strong, you don’t avoid pain. You lean into it until the weight gets easier and easier to lift.” Share stories of times when pain was an important part of growth. Weightlifting makes muscles strong. To be strong in virtue, we must work those muscles. In your church, what are times and places where people work the muscles of love and patience? Name some wicked problems that impact your church. Try out the pine cone metaphor as a way of viewing these challenges: imagining that the fires of conflict could transform your church. What would that be like? Share a story about a time when you saw people in church “practicing what they preach, in the middle of the fire.” What did people say and do? What were the results? This discussion is also available as a PDF. Help yourself to this free resource!
Daily Practices for You to Implement Today
November 2, 2016 | Jennifer Vander Molen
Daily Practices for You to Implement Today
Our formula for The Colossian Way experience is Wicked Problems + Christian Virtues = Conflict as Opportunity. What that means is when we are faced with tough, unsolvable, deep cultural issues (things like poverty, racism, human origins, sexuality), we must practice the ancient virtues taught by the church. The virtues are things like worship, prayer, humility, kindness, and patience. Often this is the opposite of our natural instincts when faced with conflict. It's called the Fight or Flight Response for a reason, and loving God and our neighbor is not what we are doing while fighting or hiding from conflict. How do we get better? Cultivating these virtues is as simple as working at it. If you want to speak another language, you practice by conducting conversations in that language. If you want to build strength in your body, you practice consistent weight and cardiovascular training. If you want to lose weight, you practice by consuming less calories than you burn. If you want to strengthen your prayer life, you practice turning to prayer regularly. In that spirit, here are 10 very practice-able things you can do. It centers around strengthening character and all of these are something you can put into practice today. Pick one, commit to it, and see how your world opens up. Thanks to our friends at Let it Ripple Film Studio for the list, which they compiled with their partners at a Character Day Partner Summit. 10 Daily Practices to Strengthen Character Every night before bed, think of three moments or people you are grateful for. #Gratitude Identify your top three strengths and find ways to bring them into your life in new ways. #Character Identify one strength you want to develop and make a list of practices you can do each day to strengthen it. #Perspective #Perseverance Think of people you see everyday but don’t know personally — find out their name and something about them. Put yourself in someone else’s shoes. #Empathy #Curiosity Next time you’re in a group setting, if you’re a shy person, try to raise your hand or speak first; if you’re a vocal person, let others speak first. #Humility #Courage Recognize character strengths in others and compliment them regularly. #gratitude #Perspective #Empathy Think of one of your heroes and identify the strengths you admire in them #Leadership If you have an email that is stressing you out, sleep on it before you send #Self-control Recognize teachable moments in real life and on screen and identify what strengths they exercise. #SocialIntelligence Ask people for permission to post (PTP) before sharing their photo online. #Kindness #Self-Control
Tradition and Innovation
June 29, 2016 | Christopher R. Brewer
Tradition and Innovation
Shortly after arriving at TCF, Michael Gulker suggested that I consider attending the Foundations of Christian Leadership program hosted by Leadership Education at Duke Divinity. This program focuses on the idea of traditioned innovation, which, as the name suggests, has to do with innovating within existing institutions. When I first heard the term “traditioned innovation,” I couldn’t help but think of aggiornamento, an Italian word meaning “a bringing up to date.” The word was used by Pope John XXIII, and is most often associated with the work of the Second Vatican Council (1962–65). A rival group reacted against aggiornamento, pushing instead for ressourcement, by which they meant a return to the sources. If the first group’s future orientation emphasized innovation, the second group looked to the past and emphasized tradition. Howard E. Root, who was an Anglican observer at the Council, appropriated this distinction in his 1972 Bampton Lectures, speaking of two kinds of radicalism, one forward-looking and the other backward-looking. In his lectures “The Limits of Radicalism,” Root addressed radicalism and tradition, and more specifically, the death of God theology that had grown from the seeds of 1960s Cambridge radicalism. Root’s concern was that these radicals were obsessed with change, evincing a perpetual anxiety for the future. Root, who was himself a one-time Cambridge radical, wished to distance himself from this particular variety of radicalism, and so advocated a radicalism rooted in tradition. Drawing upon his experience at the Second Vatican Council, Root was practicing traditioned innovation. Why is this history important? Because it offers a backdrop for navigating our current context, one in which we face a host of wicked problems requiring a Root-styled, backward-looking radicalism. Root understood that radicalism (i.e., innovation) is necessary, but that it must be carefully distinguished from reductionism. Theological integrity (i.e., tradition) must be maintained. And yet, in maintaining tradition, we must not treat theology as a “museum subject.” Theology, after all, is not “a subject in the past tense” (Root, “The Limits of Radicalism,” Lecture 2). This led Root, in his final lecture, to conclude: “The limits of radicalism are those which end not in chaos but in the breaking of fresh ground. Let the voices speak. Let the contestants push to those limits they find for themselves. In the end, theology is not its own master. Tradition is not an overlord or a censor. It is there. What will last will last. What will fall away will fall away. Method will unfold itself in the exploration” (Root, “The Limits of Radicalism,” Lecture 8). For Root, the exploration unfolded in a number of interesting contexts, but most relevant here is his participation as a member of the first phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC). Now in its third phase (2011–present), ARCIC is working through issues related to “fundamental questions regarding the ‘Church as Communion – Local and Universal’, and ‘How in communion the Local and Universal Church comes to discern right ethical teaching’.” (IARCCUM) Unlike the earlier phases that were concerned with comparing beliefs or finding common sources, this third phase – influenced by the Receptive Ecumenism project – is seeking to change the question from “What do the other traditions first need to learn from us?” to “What do we need to learn from them?” They are, in other words, seeking to innovate what was in Root’s time an innovation. TCF is in many respects similar to this exercise in church learning. Standing in a long tradition of intra-Church dialogue, then, we are committed to facilitating dialogue on divisive topics and approaching differing perspectives as Christ-given opportunities to build community, expand knowledge, and deepen faith. Our innovation is a unique combination of conversations that might be represented as follows: Wicked Problems + Christian Virtues = Conflict as Opportunity Making progress on these wicked problems requires a willingness to enter into relationships, risking vulnerability, and refusing competition. It requires, in other words, that we practice the Christian virtues of love, hospitality, patience, etc. The dialogue need not be feared. It can be faced. We can, with God’s help, put hope in practice.