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Displaying all posts tagged "The Colossian Way".
Conflict and Christian Discipleship - Michael Gulker Interview with Faith and Leadership
January 24, 2019 | Michael Gulker
Conflict and Christian Discipleship - Michael Gulker Interview with Faith and Leadership
The church today has a poor record in helping people navigate conflict, but conflict can be the very thing that can heal them. In fact, we can harness it to be better disciples. Learn more in Faith and Leadership's interview with The Colossian Forum President Michael Gulker here.    
Re-shaping and Re-forming Through Conflict
December 20, 2017 | Rob Barrett
Re-shaping and Re-forming Through Conflict
Q: How can a conflict be a place of Christian formation? A: While most people see a divisive issue as a problem to overcome, at The Colossian Forum we see such conflicts as places of growth. Conflict shines light on our souls. When pressures mount, our character becomes apparent. Some of what we see is disappointing, as when we protect ourselves more than our vulnerable neighbor. On the other hand, when humility emerges under pressure, it is humility indeed. But beyond learning about ourselves, conflicts are classrooms for learning new habits. Messy conflicts are more than problems to be solved. They place us on the brink of being more deeply formed as Christians. Unfortunately, we have been deeply formed by our polarized culture. The 24-hour news cycle teaches us that there are two ways of seeing the world: a right way and a wrong way, and that both can be summarized in a tweet. Our constant consumption of news, of arguments, information, facts, and stats from our channel of choice plays to our belief that if we can just deploy the right information with enough flair, the world will be forced to see things our way. But then we discover (over and over again) that this doesn’t work. The other side always has a counterargument. We get frustrated and begin thinking of them as willfully naïve, stupid, or just plain evil. Each time the news cycle goes around, we are tempted to increasing viciousness. Our capacity for living according to Christ’s pattern grows weaker and weaker. But there’s always a God-pleasing way forward for Christians. When we recognize our malformation, we have the opportunity to seek God’s gracious work that will re-form us into the shape we were intended to be. And we have a role in this reshaping work. Christians have always recognized that “getting saved” is only the beginning of growing in faithfulness. Walking this road of formation, of discipleship, is a central mark of the Christian life. Our formation as disciples proceeds best if it flows out of more than good intentions. Christians have generally understood certain practices to build good Christian character. Prayer, Bible reading, receiving the Lord’s Supper, hymn singing, giving to those in need: such traditional practices form Christians (by God’s grace) into people who are patient, humble, truthful, and loving. These basic Christian practices can be helpfully complemented by additional practices that are particularly suited for responding to the cultural pressures of the age. The Colossian Way is a practice of engaging a challenging topic while simultaneously pursuing obedience and faithfulness to Christ. Such a practice channels the pressure and energy around a “hot topic” into constructive spiritual formation. At the same time, good formation is the best pathway for solving the problem before us.
The Joy of the Inner-Directed Life
November 15, 2017 | Jennifer Vander Molen
The Joy of the Inner-Directed Life
Lou Huesmann is the senior pastor at Grace Long Beach, which recently went through The Colossian Way training. He shared this excellent reflection and an article from Rabbi Sacks with us. Thanks, Lou!   Is character strictly personal, or does culture have a part to play? In other words, does when and where you live make a difference to the kind of person you become? These questions are raised by Rabbi Jonathan Sacks in a recent reflection on the classic book from 1950, The Lonely Crowd. The book's two sociologist authors develop the idea that particular kinds of historical circumstances give rise to particular kinds of people. In reflecting on The Lonely Crowd, Rabbi Sacks argues for the recovery of an "inner-directed" people for the sake of the world. In a culture largely comprised of "other-directed" individuals who find their direction in life from contemporary culture and winning the approval of others, the work of The Colossian Forum is vital. The Colossian Forum is providing groundbreaking training that has the potential to change not simply individuals but also the larger culture through its emphasis on developing the acquisition of virtues and practices that mark an "inner-directed" person. It's this inner-directedness that provides the security and courage to be different and the confidence to build a better, more life-giving future. Inner-Directedness, by Rabbi Jonathan Sacks. If you see something that sparks a connection with TCF's mission, we'd love to hear from you!
Hating Your Neighbor Will Make You Dumb
October 4, 2017 | Jennifer Vander Molen
Hating Your Neighbor Will Make You Dumb
Lou Huesmann attended our recent Colossian Way leader training with a team of people from his church, Grace in Long Beach, CA.  He sent us a link to this article in Christianity Today, which talks about a new book from Alan Jacobs, How to Think. "This is a ready-made explanation for anyone who wants to understand why The Colossian Forum is needed," said Lou. We couldn't agree more. Petitions, protests, and popular rallies reveal our deeply ingrained belief that voices shouting loudly in unison can shape reality. In today’s climate, many of us crave clear battle lines between good and evil and abhor anyone who dares admit that complex problems don’t have simple answers. And heaven help any poor public figures foolish enough to sincerely change their minds. Read the full article here. (The article is behind CT's paywall, so if you don't have a subscription, you can check out more on How to Think via Amazon or your local bookseller.)
Second Colossian Way Cohort Kicks Off
September 27, 2017 | Jennifer Vander Molen
Second Colossian Way Cohort Kicks Off
Last week, we hosted 22 leaders, 7 coaches, and 4 observers at our second Colossian Way leader training. This was the first training held in our Grand Rapids office, and we enjoyed hosting these leaders from across the country as they were trained to lead the Colossian Way experience in their local churches and schools. The cohort delved into the mission and vision of The Colossian Forum, unpacked what it means to tackle conflict as an opportunity for deeper discipleship, and got hands-on tips and experience leading a small group. This cohort will lead their local small groups through both the sexuality and origins experience. Leaders came to this training from Alaska, California, Colorado, Tennessee, and Michigan. Please join us in praying for these brothers and sisters in Christ as they gather their small groups to run The Colossian Way in early 2018. We look forward to hearing and sharing more about their journey through The Colossian Way! How you can get involved If you're interested in leading a Colossian Way small group in your church or school, please visit our Colossian Way page to find out more information about upcoming cohorts, training, and details. Our next leader training is in May 2018. We hope to see you there! Scenes from Colossian Way leader training [gallery size="medium" ids="8340,8350,8341,8342,8343,8344,8354,8346,8347,8348,8349,8352"]
What Does Practicing Virtue Look Like? A Study of Prudence
August 30, 2017 | TCF Intern
What Does Practicing Virtue Look Like? A Study of Prudence
One of the most important virtues for us to practice is the virtue of prudence. Contrary to popular belief, prudence doesn’t mean being stingy or too scared to act. Prudence is the practice of wisdom or seeing rightly.   Practicing the virtue of prudence is akin to actively resisting impulsive actions, like devouring that whole chocolate cake. Or not letting fearful and prideful passion overrun you in an anxious situation. Practicing prudence can also mean resisting stubbornness. We do these things until it becomes second nature to us. It’s wise not to eat the whole chocolate cake--that’s prudence. Let me give you an example of someone who practiced the virtue of prudence: In the movie Billy Elliot, a boy named Billy tries to be a boxer. He knew what boys did with their pastime: boys box. Those are the facts. There’s one small flaw: he’s horrible at boxing. One day Billy sees the ballet class going on next door. As he’s looking in at the class, Mrs. Wilkinson, the instructor, invites him in. She quickly sees that Billy has the capability to become a prolific ballet dancer. For Billy and his family, this can’t be true; boys don’t dance, they box. Those are the facts. Every impulse and passion of Billy’s community says that boys can’t be ballet dancers. The community is stubborn in what they think they know the truth is and should be. But it’s Mrs. Wilkinson’s good habit, practicing prudence, that enables her to see the truth that Billy isn’t a boxer, but an amazing dancer. Through practicing the virtue of prudence, Mrs. Wilkinson was able to show the truth that Billy was made to dance. What ended up happening was that the rest of their community came to more fully know both truth and love. In their conflict, a good habit got them to a new place they never knew was possible. Practicing virtues are the way that liberates us to actually know truth and love. It liberates us from our old selves which are impulsive, passion-driven, and stubborn. Practicing prudence allows the Holy Spirit to get to us. It’s letting the Holy Spirit lead us to where we too can be liberated of our own ideas of who we think God is. That’s what The Colossian Way is designed to do: liberate us from speaking past each other and missing out on truth and love. Come and Dance Friends, God is always speaking. Just like in the beginning, He’s speaking and creating something new, this time he’s making us anew.  He’s speaking through the Bible, but the Holy Spirit is also communicating to us as through prayer and through each other. Come join this dance, and learn to dance with truth and love.